John Glassie

Interesting things. Some relate to an interesting person named Athanasius Kircher, or to a book I wrote about him called A Man of Misconceptions. More about me here until I figure out the rest.
les-sources-du-nil:

Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904)
Jump in Place, Feet Together, circa 1886

les-sources-du-nil:

Étienne-Jules Marey (1830-1904)

Jump in Place, Feet Together, circa 1886

— 1 week ago with 1320 notes

mapsinchoate:

Orra White Hitchcock for use in Professor Edward Hitchcock’s classes on geology and natural history. (1828-1840) Pen and ink on linen.

(1.) Vein of Greenstone in Clay Slate, Charlestown, Mass. (2.) Trap Dike in Sandstone, East Haven (3.) Slate, Devon, England (4.) Valleys (5.) Contortions in Clay Beds, Deerfield, Mass. (6.) Coal basin and Dike (7.)Kirkdale Cavern (Amherst College Archives & Special Collections) (via the-rx)

(via ffactory)

— 2 weeks ago with 150 notes
calumet412:

Eleanor and Barbara, 1953, Chicago. Harry Callahan

calumet412:

Eleanor and Barbara, 1953, Chicago. Harry Callahan

(via ffactory)

— 2 weeks ago with 47 notes
vjeranski:


Oscar Niemeyer. Modulo. 26 1961: 23

vjeranski:

Oscar Niemeyer. Modulo. 26 1961: 23

(via one-of-365)

— 2 months ago with 85 notes
volvellery:

Chart of Knowledge: EuropeChart of Knowledge Co. of America — Boston, Mass.1931; 10.25”  Ø 
I am dorkily excited that I just acquired (via eBay) the brother to the United States Chart of Knowledge. Yes, it’s true, I am now in possession of the Europe Chart of Knowledge. I love so many things about it, including the Downton Abbey thoughts it inspires when I dial up Great Britain and Ireland. Also great: the indicator arrow that rises out of the Scandinavian Peninsula to tell you which country’s wildly out of date facts you are studying (though I guess Principle Rivers and Highest Mountains rarely change) actually emerges just slightly from the inner dial. A great detail! I also love the little triangles below each country’s name to line up with the arrow. And how wonderfully strange that the only mountains drawn are the Ural Mts., which are indicated by large tire tracks. Plus who doesn’t love an abbreviation that leaves a trail of apostrophes in its wake as M’N’F’G.?
In this view (again pardon the awkward scan-stitching) we learn that Iceland’s Principal Imports are All Necessaries, that its Government is a Constitutional Monarchy, that its Principal River is the Thjorsa, and that Principal Agricultural Products include Hay, Potatoes, and Turnips. Or at least they did in 1931. 
I like to imagine that there are little people in the giant Chart of Knowledge zeppelin, taking an educational time-travel tour of Europe, admiring the facts of Finland, Sweden, and Norway, on their way across the continent. Sign me up!

volvellery:

Chart of Knowledge: Europe
Chart of Knowledge Co. of America — Boston, Mass.
1931; 10.25”  Ø 

I am dorkily excited that I just acquired (via eBay) the brother to the United States Chart of Knowledge. Yes, it’s true, I am now in possession of the Europe Chart of Knowledge. I love so many things about it, including the Downton Abbey thoughts it inspires when I dial up Great Britain and Ireland. Also great: the indicator arrow that rises out of the Scandinavian Peninsula to tell you which country’s wildly out of date facts you are studying (though I guess Principle Rivers and Highest Mountains rarely change) actually emerges just slightly from the inner dial. A great detail! I also love the little triangles below each country’s name to line up with the arrow. And how wonderfully strange that the only mountains drawn are the Ural Mts., which are indicated by large tire tracks. Plus who doesn’t love an abbreviation that leaves a trail of apostrophes in its wake as M’N’F’G.?

In this view (again pardon the awkward scan-stitching) we learn that Iceland’s Principal Imports are All Necessaries, that its Government is a Constitutional Monarchy, that its Principal River is the Thjorsa, and that Principal Agricultural Products include Hay, Potatoes, and Turnips. Or at least they did in 1931. 

I like to imagine that there are little people in the giant Chart of Knowledge zeppelin, taking an educational time-travel tour of Europe, admiring the facts of Finland, Sweden, and Norway, on their way across the continent. Sign me up!

— 3 months ago with 5 notes
volvellery:

New South Wales By TrainWaite & Bull, 19389.75” Ø 
Despite its somewhat ragged condition, this is one of the gems of my collection. I’ve never been to New South Wales (or any part of Australia), but I have all kinds of romantic ideas about how wonderful it would be, based solely on this volvelle. The colors are lovely, the fonts for “TRAVEL by TRAIN” on the left are fantastic, and the Service Speed Safety is perfect. It’s interesting that the train is actually a pretty marginal part of the design, but it’s great that the signal is incorporated both into the map number indicator and the arrow.
Here’s a sentence from the back (which is just black and white): “This Souvenir is issued to perpetuate the great exhibit of the New South Wales Railways in the Commemorative Pavilion erected on the north-eastern corner of the Royal Agricultural Society’s Showground at Moore Park, Sydney, for the Royal Show of 1938.”

volvellery:

New South Wales By Train
Waite & Bull, 1938
9.75” Ø 

Despite its somewhat ragged condition, this is one of the gems of my collection. I’ve never been to New South Wales (or any part of Australia), but I have all kinds of romantic ideas about how wonderful it would be, based solely on this volvelle. The colors are lovely, the fonts for “TRAVEL by TRAIN” on the left are fantastic, and the Service Speed Safety is perfect. It’s interesting that the train is actually a pretty marginal part of the design, but it’s great that the signal is incorporated both into the map number indicator and the arrow.

Here’s a sentence from the back (which is just black and white): “This Souvenir is issued to perpetuate the great exhibit of the New South Wales Railways in the Commemorative Pavilion erected on the north-eastern corner of the Royal Agricultural Society’s Showground at Moore Park, Sydney, for the Royal Show of 1938.”

— 3 months ago with 4 notes
volvellery:

RIGID-tex Metal pattern selectorRigidized Metals Corp. — Buffalo, NYDate Unknown; 6”  Ø 
I bet you thought The Volvellery had forgotten you, didn’t you? Of course it hasn’t! It’s just been a little busy with other things. And look, I just got a nifty gift from Paul Lukas: a pattern selector from Rigid-tex Metal. Look at all those patterns you can choose from! The back is basically the same as the front (just with additional patterns) except for one thing: a really great 3-Dimensional bit over on the right. Too bad there’s no company stamped into the “For prompt service call:” part, but otherwise this volvelle is pretty much perfect. Cheery green color, nice arrows, interesting copy. Thanks, Paul!

volvellery:

RIGID-tex Metal pattern selector
Rigidized Metals Corp. — Buffalo, NY
Date Unknown; 6”  Ø 

I bet you thought The Volvellery had forgotten you, didn’t you? Of course it hasn’t! It’s just been a little busy with other things. And look, I just got a nifty gift from Paul Lukas: a pattern selector from Rigid-tex Metal. Look at all those patterns you can choose from! The back is basically the same as the front (just with additional patterns) except for one thing: a really great 3-Dimensional bit over on the right. Too bad there’s no company stamped into the “For prompt service call:” part, but otherwise this volvelle is pretty much perfect. Cheery green color, nice arrows, interesting copy. Thanks, Paul!

— 3 months ago with 1 note
laukitsch:

everybodylookatyourhands:

Cover design by Mike Pope (photo Nelson Chrismas)

laukitsch:

everybodylookatyourhands:

Cover design by Mike Pope (photo Nelson Chrismas)

— 3 months ago with 101 notes